Monthly Archives: February 2018

The London Bombings – Experience from the Shop Floor – Trauma Orthopaedics

Tuesday 27 March 2018 at 6.00pm

Dr Anjan Banerjee , Orthopaedic Surgeon

Venue: EIT Lecture Theatre 2

Admission: Gold coin donation

7 July 2005 started just like any other day: the trip to work and then the Trauma Meeting at St Mary’s Hospital followed by the Ward Round. Unfortunately the day changed after that. The Chinese curse “May you live in interesting times,” seemed most apt to describe that day. Soon after the meeting ended the MAJAX Alert was sent to all Pagers in the Hospital.

This is an account of how the hospital and in particular the Orthopaedic & Trauma Team at St Mary’s Hospital responded to the Major Incident and an overview of the principles of Mass Casualty Management and Damage Control Orthopaedic Surgery.

Dr Anjan Banerjee is a General Practitioner at the Taradale Medical Centre who has 15 years’ experience in Trauma & Orthopaedic Surgery. He also works as a GP with Special interest in Musculoskeletal Medicine and is a Police Medical Officer for Hawkes Bay. He was Trained in the UK and holds a MBChB from Dundee University and the MRCS from The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. At the time of the London Bombings, he was the Spinal Registrar at St Mary’s Hospital in London, which received all the casualties from the Edgeware Road bomb in the London underground.

Gravitational waves: listening in to the sounds of the universe

Tuesday 10 April 2018 at 7.00pm

Professor Joachim Brand

Dodd-Walls Centre for Photonics and Quantum Technologies, New Zealand and Institute of Advanced Study, Massey University Auckland

Venue: Holt’s Planetarium, NBHS, Chambers Street, Napier

Admission: Gold coin donation

This lecture examines how the detection of gravitational waves resembles listening more than seeing and how the merging of two black holes was ‘heard’, a discovery that most likely could never have been made with conventional telescopes. Joachim also looks at the amazing technology of laser interferometry that made this detection possible, and the development of quantum technologies that will make future detectors even more sensitive.

Joachim Brand is a theoretical physicist and a true explorer. He is drawn to the wildest most untamed realms of physics where the rules we learn at school no longer apply. Joachim refers to these realms as “unsafe” zones. His passion is to establish little islands of order and safety amidst the chaos. His main motivation is curiosity but his intrepid adventures are also laying the foundations for the technological revolutions of the future like quantum computing.

Originally from a small town in Germany, Joachim first came to New Zealand as an undergraduate backpacker with a bike. He spent eight weeks riding around and fell in love with the country. He did his PhD in Quantum Chemistry at Heidelberg University but then discovered the emerging field of cold atoms and switched direction. He was already captivated by quantum theory and this new field would allow him to create and observe almost any quantum phenomena he could think up. Joachim spent his Postdoc at the University of Washington learning everything he could about cold atoms. After that, a four-year advanced Postdoc at the Max Planck Institute enabled him to meet and work with many of the world’s leading theorists. Then, looking for some space and quiet to get on with his own work, Joachim applied for a job in New Zealand. Now both he and his wife, who is also a Professor of Physics, are happily settled at Massey University in Auckland.


Seaweek lecture: Stingrays

Wednesday 7 March 2018 at 7.30pm

Helen Cadwallader MSc, PhD student, Waikato University

Venue: National Aquarium, Marine Parade, Napier

Admission: Gold coin donation

Stingrays in New Zealand are largely understudied, but as large coastal elasmobranch species, they are potentially exposed to some of the greatest anthropogenic risks. This talk will describe what we know about them, why they are important, and how we as humans are affecting them, from removal of habitat to their portrayal in the media. It will also highlight why we in New Zealand are in an excellent position to study them, and describe Helen’s current study on New Zealand’s rays, including how the rays here in the Aquarium have joined in the research.

Helen Cadwallader is a PhD candidate with the University of Waikato based at the Coastal Marine Field Station in Tauranga. She completed her MSc at Bangor University in her home country of Wales, where she specialised in cleaner-client interactions between tropical wrasse and pelagic thresher sharks, and her BSc at the University of Bristol, where her honours research concentrated on the behavioural reactions of freshwater fish to anthropogenic underwater noise. Helen specialises in elasmobranch behaviour and ecology and her PhD focuses on the stingray species in New Zealand, their spatial and feeding ecology in the Tauranga Harbour, and the potential impacts that the urbanisation of this area may be having on them.